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Psychotherapy Networker Webinar & Blog

The Great Attachment Debate


Networker Magazine recently featured an article on The Great Attachment Debate, summarizing developments in attachment research and therapy. For counterbalance, childhood expert Jerome Kagan commented critically about the research and David spoke about attachment-based therapy.

Editor Rich Simon followed up in a 6-part New Perspectives on Practice: The Great Attachment Debate series with 1-hour webinars with Alan Sroufe, Allan Schore, Dan Siegel, Susan Johnson, Jerome Kagan and David Schnarch. (click here for webinar reruns.)

Webinars aired over the last few weeks; David's ran a short while ago. There has been lots of activity on the webinar discussion blog. Posts have been thoughtful, challenging, exciting and illuminating. It has turned into a dialogue between David and the psychotherapy industry, especially with attachment-based therapists. Not surprisingly, David has a lot to say. Unexpectedly, the dialogue documents what we've been saying about pitfalls in attachment-based therapy.

If you want to see how psychotherapy is widely conducted today, and how the Crucible Approach differs, don't miss this finely-detailed pithy exchange. You'll find therapists' statements and questions together with David's responses. Whether you are a mental health professional or academic, graduate student in training, currently in treatment, or considering treatment, you're bound to learn a lot.

  • Can therapists give too much support and empathy?
  • What's "too much" collaborative confrontation?
  • Do you have to get more attached to your partner before you can differentiate?
  • Is marriage basically a recapitulation of unresolved childhood issues?
  • How does differentiation-based therapy differ from attachment-based therapy?
  • What kinds of therapeutic errors are therapists more likely to make?

Take a look at this discussion of cutting edges issues facing therapists, clients, and today's psychotherapy industry.

To read more on the PsychotherapyNetworker.com web site, click here.